Summer heat is here! Use caution with your pets

Hi, my name is Smoky. My dad was deployed and will not be back for a long time. I’m very sad, but I met Auntie D. with Rovers and she said that he will always be my father but she promised that she will find me a wonderful home with wonderful people who will take me for walks, play ball and that I will be able to watch TV with them too. Are you my new family? If you would like me to give you kisses, please contact D., Rover’s Rest Stop at 480-600-2828 or by e-mail at D@RoversRestStop.com.

Hi, my name is Smoky. My dad was deployed and will not be back for a long time. I’m very sad, but I met Auntie D. with Rovers and she said that he will always be my father but she promised that she will find me a wonderful home with wonderful people who will take me for walks, play ball and that I will be able to watch TV with them too. Are you my new family? If you would like me to give you kisses, please contact D., Rover’s Rest Stop at 480-600-2828 or by e-mail at [email protected]

With the hot weather comes a different set of rules for our four-legged kids. Be mindful of the dangers in our summer heat for both you and your pets.

Hydration: Water is very, very important for your four-legged kids. Dehydration can cause serious health issues including kidney and heart damage. Don’t forget to take water for your dog on your walks.

Car precautions: Never ever leave your pet in the car during our hot Arizona summers – not even with the windows cracked. Did you know that on an 85 degree day, in less than 10 minutes the inside of your car’s interior can reach 102 degrees, even when the windows have been left open an inch or two? When the temperature is a pleasant 70 degrees, within 30 minutes the car’s interior can reach 120 degrees. So, in Arizona there is no such thing as just running into Circle K for a coffee. If you see a dog in a parked car alert store management; if the owner does not return immediately, call 911.

Heatstroke: If out in the direct sun, with sustained exercise, heatstroke can occur within five minutes. Watch for a red tongue, dark red gums, panting hard, pacing and breathing rapidly. Get the dog to a cool, shady, breezy spot and offer small amounts of water, relax him to bring his body temperature down. Pour cool water (not ice water) or put wet towels on his body. If he is losing consciousness place him on his side and be sure his tongue is pulled out so he can breathe. The dog is going into shock and you must get him to a vet for intravenous fluids immediately.

Hot asphalt: Take you shoes off, walk on the asphalt. If it is too hot for you it is definitely too hot for your dog. Arizona asphalt can reach temperature in excess of 143 degrees. At 125 degrees skin destruction can occur in 60 seconds. An egg can fry in five minutes at 131 degrees. Even with an air temperature of 77 degrees the asphalt can reach 125 degrees. (Data source: Thermal contact burns from streets and highways; Journal of the American Medical Association).