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Social Bridge celebrates two nonagenarian birthdays

Stephanie Martin

Stephanie Martin

Carol Male

Carol Male

Larry Kostroski

Scientists frequently advise that playing cards and doing crossword puzzles could help lessen the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. These activities help to preserve cognitive functions in regions of the brain involved in the disease. The Robson Ranch Social Bridge Club heartily agrees with these scientists.

In December the club will celebrate the 90th birthdays of members Carol Male and Stephanie Martin. Both members religiously attend the weekly club gatherings on Wednesdays in the Cheyenne Room of the Robson Ranch House.

Stephanie was raised in a small town in Pennsylvania, married and had three children. She was a business woman who owned and managed a tavern and restaurant for 30 years. She lived with her daughter, Marci Bartley, for 25 years in Florida until they both moved to RR one and a half years ago. Stephanie is known for her love of her granddaughter, laughter, music, dancing and driving stock cars where she won many a race on the oval dirt tracks in Pennsylvania.

Carole was raised in Cleveland, Ohio, where she married and raised five daughters and one son. She was a nurse, a parochial school teacher and owned and operated a restaurant/bakery for years. She was additionally involved in the gaming industry as a bookie. Carol lived at Sun Lakes for 11 years before moving here in 2007. She currently has 12 grandchildren and eight great grandchildren. Carol has been the president key member of the RR Social Bridge Club for five years and arrives an hour ahead of time to prepare the room for play.

The RR Social Bridge Club has 52 members. Available members play social bridge from 1 to 4 p.m. each Wednesday. Social bridge consists of four sets of six hands or 24 total hands. Carol collects $1 from each player before the start of play. Players are randomly directed to each table by “tallies” that assign numbers to players, their partners and their table numbers. Each group of four plays six hands, and the total score is noted on a small form with their name on it. After all tables have completed their six hands they shift to their next assigned table and partner and play another six hands. This cycle continues until all 24 hands have been played. After all four sets, scores are totaled. The highest individual scores gets a small monetary award. The amount of the prize depends on the number of players. Players also pay five cents for each down trick and on bid and made slams; a slam pot is awarded to the involved partnership. The slam pot is generated by slams that are not bid but made and where each player must then deposit a quarter for not bidding their slam.

All experienced bridge players are encouraged to attend these weekly sessions to see how social bridge can improve your mind.